Category: Interventions in Nature

  • citrus-18

    Project in the Citrus Grove at Taliesin-West, Scottsdale, AZ, February 2011

    During an artist residency in Scottsdale, AZ  I was fascinated to find a citrus grove full of ripe fruit. While enjoying the fruit I also questioned their suitability for an arid region – and ultimately their water consumption to grow these juicy fruits. To my surprise I found out that the ancient Hohokam tribes once home in this region also grew crops that relied on irrigation.

    I created labels for the fruits – to put them into context with the greater Phoenix environment, and to inspire thought and creativity. The oranges bear spiral-shaped excerpts from Pima Indian mythology. The grapefruits bear a Hohokam labyrinth. I attached the labels to the fruits in a ceremonial act, and after their harvest distributed them amongst the Taliesin community.

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  • 01-paradise tree

    Paradise Tree, Southern Spain, September 2008

    My visit to coastal Southern Spain brought up childhood imaginations of biblical stories, set in a land of eternal sun, full of ripe, exotic fruits that I could only romanticize about as a Northern European child. Medieval paintings of paradise come to mind; Adam and Eve in the foreground and terraced landscapes towering behind them, barren at times, and yet mysteriously bearing delicious crops. I tried to find words reflecting what I saw, heard, smelled and experienced. I embroidered these words onto the leaves of a fig tree. The slow, meditative act of embroidering became a performance, commemorating myths of Moorish times telling of beautiful young women who, while being kept at home, were dreaming of passion and adventure. The embroidering process was documented on video. While the leaves would fall to the ground and decay in fall, the piece remains as an installation with 50 photo prints (13”x18”) and video.

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  • 03-sun-moon symbol

    Sun/Moon Symbol, Wyoming 2008

    Sun/Moon Symbol was created during a performance/ritual in the Northern Wyoming prairie. Using my step’s length for measurement I laid out a circle and filled out its perimeter with rooks. Its 2 main axis points in the 4 cardinal directions, the intermediates are marked in between them. The symbol resembles ancient sun symbols, as they appeared in very similar ways in indigenous cultures throughout world. In many cases the same symbol simultaneously represented the moon.

    I coated the rocks with phosphorescent paint, so that they would glow for several hours after sunset and created a counterpart to the stars in a deep black Wyoming night. The absence of the moon caused the earth to “disappear” from vision, so that the symbol appeared to be hovering.

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